Issue - October 2009



October 2009

Editorial

In this fiftieth edition, we present Pinami Open Air Museum, researched by Dylan Rudloff & written by Justin Gouin; Petra Vissers' interview with Pirai Vaca; Justin Gouin tells us about Manuela Gandarillas and Tusoco Viajes; a tribute for Martha Estivariz by Ed Young, finally Luis Fernanado Terrazas tells us about Cochabamba's landscapes through Garcilaso de la Vega's sonnets.read more...

October 2009

Editorial

In this fiftieth edition, we present Piñami Open Air Museum, researched by Dylan Rudloff & written by Justin Gouin; Petra Vissers’ interview with Piraí Vaca; Justin Gouin tells us about Manuela Gandarillas and Tusoco Viajes; a tribute for Martha Estivariz by Ed Young, finally Luis Fernanado Terrazas tells us about Cochabamba’s landscapes through Garcilaso de la Vega’s sonnets.

The main objective of the cocha-banner is to promote different types of social work and happenings inCochabamba or Bolivia in general, many of which thepeople of Cochabamba and visitors are unaware of. Itis geared to help organizations, foundations and othergroups spread the word of the work they do.

If you would like to present an article to publish in the cocha-banner or have any comments please send it to our email address:

cocha_banner@yahoo.co.uk

Cocha-banner is sponsored by: Projects Abroad an international development organisation.

Ximena Noya
Editor

PiNami Open Air Museum:
A Hidden Gem in the
Cochabamba Valley

In 1980, one of the Cochabamba Valley’s most important archaeological sites was discovered quite by accident in Piñami, a neighbourhood located in the town of Quillacollo. While constructing a playground, workers unexpectedly unearthed the ruins of a civilization dating back nearly two millennia. Further excavation revealed that the Piñami site contained hundreds of thousands of fragments of ceramic pottery, agricultural tools, cooking utensils, arrowheads and spears, the remains of local flora and fauna, and nearly one hundred and fifty tombs with well preserved human remains. After over twenty years, archeologists began to conduct serious analysis and began to work with the local community with the eventual goal of opening the Piñami Archeological Site to the public as an open-air museum.

read more ...

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