Issue - July 2009



July 2009

Editorial

In this issue: Rachel Dakin tell us about her visit to Community of Producers in Arts; Rebecca Wearmouth writes about El Hogar de Ninas San Francisco; before concluding Walter Sanchez C describes the art of Stained Glass.read more...

July 2009

The Art of Stained Glass

Agreement between Projects Abroad & the Department of Lingüística Aplicada a la Enseñanza de Lenguas

El Arte de pintar vidrio

Walter Sánchez Canedo
INIAM
Universidad Mayor de San Simón

Faculty Advisor Lic. Mónica Ruiz.
Miguel Ajhuacho , Veronica Castro, Jenny Lara , Nelly Miranda,
Marianela Pinto, Cynthia Valverde, Natalia Rodriguez

The art of stained glass spread from Europe to America during the 19th Century due to a combination of renewed interest in Gothic art, the summit of the Art Nouveau and the peak of the Belle Epoque. The 20th century continued to strengthen the bonds between architecture and glass as a decorative art. In addition, there was a contribution from a new modernist sensibility which was tied to the industrialization of society. This renewed spirit was expressed in visible changes in architectural conceptions in two ways. (1) The opening of conventional walls to “walls of light “, manifested in wide windows using stained glass. (2) New, ultramodern conceptions expressed through the use of new materials and futuristic designs. apertura de las paredes y su cambio por “muros de luz” –tanto a partir de amplias ventanas como la colocación de vitrales- y, (2) nuevas concepciones vanguardistas que se expresan en el uso de nuevos materiales y principalmente con arriesgados diseños.

Este contexto de nuevas sensibilidades y un nuevo espíritu de la época, abre grandes posibilidades a los vitralistas que se incorporan con sus diseños a la arquitectura civil sabiendo que la arquitectura civil se abre hacia ellos. En efecto, de una tradición fuertemente asociada al edificio eclesial y con temáticas asociadas a escenas de la sagrada escritura, el arte del vitral ingresa a los inmuebles públicos y a las casas particulares con una dimensión eminentemente decorativa. Despojado el vitralista-artista de la carga religiosa establece una suerte de alianza estratégica con los arquitectos para comenzar a recorrer caminos juntos no sólo en la posibilidad de jugar con luminosidades y decoraciones como elementos centrales sino intentando resolver problemáticas que hacen al confort de una vivienda y a la calidad de vida de la gente. Con nuevas ideas que desafían los antiguos cánones religiosos,

This environment of new sensitivities and the period’s new spirit opened huge possibilities to stained-glass artists. The door of civil architecture opened to artist´s who could combine their designs with the needs of architecture. Indeed, such combinations have a precedent in the tradition of ecclesiastical buildings which displayed Biblical themes. This stained-glass art found its way into public buildings and into private homes with an eminently decorative dimension. Divested of religious load, the stained-glass artist established a sort of strategic alliance with architects. They took artistic voyages together by playing with luminosities and decors as main elements, and by trying to solve practical problems such as enhancing the comfort of a home and improving peoples´ quality of life. With new challenging ideas for old canons that are religious, political, cultural, pre-modern aesthetic, and susceptible to the urbanization process, stained-glass artists and architects started a journey that is changing the urban landscape.

Little has been studied about the art of stained glass in Bolivia. Its acceptance in the architecture of the twentieth century (mainly in La Paz, a city with outstanding stained glass), is a result of many factors. But two phenomena are particularly important, both of which were a result of the transfer of the Government´s headquarters from Sucre to La Paz after the Federal War of 1899: (1) The arrival of a local mining oligarchy which was influenced by the European way of life. (2) The arrival of foreign diplomats (ambassadors, consuls, business men, etc.), introducing foreign and modern cultures. Both phenomena increased the centralization of state resources, and gave the city of La Paz an economic stability and an appearance development and progress. Stained glass gained acceptance among a new demographic of emerging political and cultural elites.

Antonio Gismondi is the most prolific stained glass artist in La Paz. His art uses techniques and technological influences taken from the Italian-Mediterranean school. His distinguishing characteristic is the separation of the creative art, left in the hands of the painter/ artist, and the practical art, left in the hands of the competent glassmaster. His works are objects of great demand which will endure in the city´s main religious, public, military, and civil government buildings. They even reach buildings in other Bolivian cities.

Who was Antonio Gismondi? He was the son of Domenico Luigi Gismondi, an Italian born in San Remo (1879), who arrived in La Paz in 1892 at the age of 12. In 1907 he installed a photo study called “Photo Art Gismondi”. In addition, Luigi Gismondi was one of the most important Bolivian photographers from the first half of the twentieth century. He had sixteen children, of whom Cesar and Luis Adolfo followed in his footsteps. But Antonio, the first-born, directed his vocation towards the art of stained glass. We do not know where he learned the trade or who his teachers were. We do know that by the 1930´s he had a very good workshop where he created the stained glass that supplied the demands of politicians, bureaucrats, diplomats and the church.

As we saw in the previous paragraph, the presence of Antonio Gismondi is signified by the peak of stained-glass in Bolivia. There is no complete register of his production. However, his stainedglass windows are in the main buildings of the western cities of Bolivia. Among the ecclesiastical buildings, we can observe the stained-glass windows that are in the church of the Exaltation in Obrajes –where it shows Lucifer who is sterile lying under the feet of and protected by the sword of St. Michael Archangel. In the Basilica of Copacabana and the church of Chulumani (North Yungas Province) there are two beautiful stained glass windows that represent St. Augustine and Santa Teresa, both donated by the prefect of the department of La Paz. In the city of Potosi, it is possible to appreciate the stained glass of the Cathedral.

Stained glasses are important in public buildings like the Government Palace and those located in the suburbs of Southern La Paz City. In Sucre, there are stained glasses made by Gismondi at Freedom House. In Cochabamba, a beautiful stained glass is in the Command and Staff School (ECEM) façade. It is made with materials brought from France. The work was done in 1941 on the eve of the creation of ECEM, with the assignment to decorate the facade as an allegory to war and victory. At the top of the glass wall is an image of the goddess of Victory in Greek mythology, emphasizing the national flag colors. On the sides, there are big images of the liberators Simón Bolívar and Antonio José of Sucre. In the lower part it shows a variety of soldiers’ weapons and figures in positions of combat that express the strength of a warrior. In the centre of the stained glass is placed the book of wisdom.

The beautiful stained-glass windows of Gismondi are also present in private buildings in several Bolivian cities. These works are characterized by themes which are less constrained, and they are inspired by typical landscapes of Bolivia. They contain great influences from nationalistic and indigenous themes such pre-Hispanic iconography, principally belonging to Tiwanaku culture. (400 AD- 1100 AD). Although the greater part of these stained-glass windows are in private residences in the city of La Paz, in Cochabamba, we found four stained-glass windows at a country house in Villa Recreo. Dated in 1948, it shows framed landscapes with Tiwanacotas motifs. In one of them stands a native with his lama, in front of Potosí city and the rich silver mountain. The second one, large-sized, is a scene of Lake Titicaca with two ferrymen, an Aymara countrywoman, and a child playing an Indian flute. The third one is a landscape of Riberalta sorrounded by the Beni river and the tropical jungle. The last one, a little stained-glass window, represents the central image of the door of the sun.

Although scarce, these examples give a clear idea of the boom of the art of painting glass in Bolivia but also the presence of stained-glass artists like Antonio Gismondi, in a context of changes of the urban architecture in Bolivia during the first half the Twentieth Century.

El arte del vitral penetra desde Europa a América ya avanzado el siglo XIX, como consecuencia de un renovado interés por el arte gótico, el auge del Art Nouveau y el apogeo de la Belle Epoque. El siglo XX no sólo continuará esta tendencia asociada a renovar los vínculos entre la arquitectura y el vidrio como arte decorativo sino que aportará elementos provenientes de una nueva sensibilidad modernista, modernizadora y ligada a la sociedad industrial.

Este renovado espíritu quedará expresado en cambios visibles en las concepciones arquitectónicas y que serán reflejadas en: (1) la apertura de las paredes y su cambio por “muros de luz” –tanto a partir de amplias ventanas wide windows using stained glass. (2) New, ultramodern conceptions expressed through the use of new materials and futuristic designs.

This environment of new sensitivities and the period’snew spirit opened huge possibilities to stained-glassartists. The door of civil architecture opened to artist´swho could combine their designs with the needs ofarchitecture. Indeed, such combinations have a precedentin the tradition of ecclesiastical buildings which displayedBiblical themes. This stained-glass art found its wayinto public buildings and into private homes with aneminently decorative dimension. Divested of religiousload, the stained-glass artist established a sort of strategicalliance with architects. They took artistic voyagestogether by playing with luminosities and decors as mainelements, and by trying to solve practical problems such asenhancing the comfort of a home and improving peoples´quality of life. With new challenging ideas for old canons como la colocación de vitrales- y, (2) nuevas concepciones vanguardistas quese expresan en el uso de nuevos materiales y principalmente con arriesgadosdiseños.

Este contexto de nuevas sensibilidades y un nuevo espíritu de la época, abre grandes posibilidades a los vitralistas que se incorporan con sus diseños a la arquitectura civil sabiendo que la arquitectura civil se abre hacia ellos. En efecto, de una tradición fuertemente asociada al edificio eclesial y con temáticas asociadas a escenas de la sagrada escritura, el arte del vitral ingresa a los inmuebles públicos y a las casas particulares con una dimensión eminentemente decorativa. Despojado el vitralista-artista de la carga religiosa establece una suerte de alianza estratégica con los arquitectos para comenzar a recorrer caminos juntos no sólo en la posibilidad de jugar con luminosidades y decoraciones como elementos centrales sino intentando resolver problemáticas que hacen al confort de una vivienda y a la calidad de vida de la gente. Con nuevas ideas que desafían los antiguos cánones religiosos, políticos, culturales, estéticos pre-modernos y sensibles al proceso de urbanización de las ciudades los artistas-vidrieros y arquitectos inician un recorrido que comienza a modificar el paisaje urbano.

Poco se ha estudiado sobre el arte del vitral en Bolivia, su entrada ysu desarrollo. Su aceptación dentro de la arquitectura del siglo XX-principalmente en La Paz, ciudad en la que aparecen destacadosvitralistas-, tiene que ver, entre muchas otras razones, con dos fenómenosprincipales: el rápido proceso de urbanización de la ciudad de La Pazposterior a la Guerra Federal de 1899 y que concluye con el traslado de lasede de Gobierno desde Sucre a esta ciudad y la influencia de corrientesexternas ya señaladas. Hay que destacar que el cambio de capitalidadgenera dos renovados fenómenos poblacionales: (1) la llegada de unaoligarquía local minera influenciada por el modo de vida europeo y(2) el arribo de personal diplomático extranjero (embajadores, cónsules,encargados de negocios, etc.), con una carga cultural no localista, modernay modernizadora. Ambos fenómenos más la centralización de los recursosestatales, harán que la ciudad de La Paz entre en una bonanza económicaque incidirá en la aparición de un renovado proceso de desarrollo y progreso.Con un contexto poblacional, político, cultural nuevo, con emergentes elitespolíticas, diplomáticas y burocráticas el vitral tomará carta de ciudadanía yde aceptación.

Antonio Gismondi fue sin lugar a dudas el vitralista más requerido en esta pujante ciudad. Su arte, con influencias técnicas y tecnológicas de la escuela vitralista mediterránea e italiana -cuya característica es la separación entre la parte creativa dejada en manos del pintor/artista y la competencia del maestro vidriero-, será objeto de una gran demanda que quedará emblematizada en la presencia de sus vitrales en los principales edificios religiosos, públicos, militares y civiles, alcanzando incluso a edificios en otras ciudades de Bolivia.

¿Quién fue Antonio Gismondi? Fue hijo de Luigi Domenico Gismondi, un italiano nacido en San Remo (1879), quien llega a la La Paz en 1892 a la edad de 12 años ciudad en la que instala -en 1907-, un Estudio fotográfico llamado “Foto Arte Gismondi”. Como dato adicional puede señalarse que Luigi Gismondi fue uno de los más importantes fotógrafos bolivianos de la primera mitad del siglo XX. Tuvo dieciséis hijos de los cuales Cesar y Luís Adolfo siguen sus pasos pero Antonio, el primogénito, orienta su vocación hacia el arte del vitral. No conocemos donde aprendió este oficio y quienes fueron sus maestros. Sí sabemos que hacia la década de 1930 tenía un taller muy bien implementado y donde realizaba los vitrales que abastecía la fuerte demanda de políticos, burócratas, diplomáticos así como de la iglesia.

Como hemos señalado, la presencia de Antonio Gismondi esta signada por el auge del vitralismo en Bolivia. No existe un registro completo de su producción. No obstante, sus vitrales se hallan en los principales edificios de las ciudades occidentales de Bolivia. Entre los edificios eclesiásticos, puede señalarse los vitrales que se hallan en la iglesia de La Exaltación en Obrajes -donde muestra a Lucifer que yace estéril bajo los pies y la espada protectora de San Miguel Arcángel-, en la Basílica de Copacabana y en la iglesia de Chulumani (Provincia Nor Yungas) –lugar en el que se hallan dos hermosos vitrales que representan a San Agustín y Santa Teresa, ambos donados por el Prefecto del departamento de La Paz-. En la ciudad de Potosí, es posible apreciarlos en la Catedral.

Son importantes los vitrales que se hallan en edificios públicos como el del Palacio de Gobierno y aquellos ubicados en la Sub-Alcaldía de la zona Sur de la ciudad de La Paz. En Sucre, vitrales hechos por Gismondi se hallan en la Casa de la Libertad. En Cochabamba, un hermoso vitral se halla en el frontis del edificio de la Escuela de Comando y Estado Mayor (ECEM), elaborado con materiales traídos de Francia. La obra, hecha en 1941 en vísperas de la creación de la ECEM y con encargo de adornar la fachada, es una alegoría a la guerra y a la victoria. En la parte superior del muro de cristal se halla la fortaleza de la diosa de la Victoria de la mitología griega, destacando los colores de la bandera nacional; en los laterales se hallan las imágenes, en gran tamaño, de los libertadores Simón Bolívar y Antonio José de Sucre. En la parte inferior se muestra una diversidad de armas y figuras de soldados en poses de combate, que expresan la fuerza física del guerrero. El centro del vitral está ocupado por el libro de la sabiduría.

Hermosos vitrales de este artista también se hallan en edificios civiles de varias ciudades de Bolivia. Estas obras se caracterizan porque sus temáticas son más libres y se inspiran en paisajes “típicos” de Bolivia, conteniendo fuerte influencia de temáticas nacionalistas e indigenistas así como de iconografía prehispánica, principalmente perteneciente a la cultura Tiwanaku (400 d.C.-1100 d.C.). Aunque la mayor parte de estos vitrales se hallan en residencias privadas de la ciudad de La Paz, en Cochabamba encontramos cuatro vitrales en una casa de campo en Villa Recreo-Tarata. Fechados en 1948, muestran paisajes enmarcados con motivos tiwanacotas. En uno de ellos destaca un indígena con su llama, con el fondo de la ciudad de Potosí y el cerro rico. El segundo, de gran tamaño, es una escena del lago Titicaca con dos balseros, una campesina aymara y un niño tocando la quena. El tercero es un paisaje de Riberalta rodeado del río Beni y la selva tropical. Un último y pequeño vitral representa la imagen central de la puerta del sol.

Aunque escasos, estos ejemplos dan una clara idea del boom del arte de pintar vidrio en Bolivia pero también de la presencia de vitralistas-artistas como Antonio Gismondi, en un contexto de cambios de la arquitectura urbana en la Bolivia de la primera mitad del siglo XX.

Cultural Agenda

Teatro Achá

Miércoles 1 Concierto de Piano - Julio Rodríguez

Miércoles 2 Concierto de música - Grupo Khiswara

Jueves 3 al domingo 5 Presentación Ballet Sentimientos de mi Tierra

Salón Gildaro Antezana

Exposiciones de los artistas

7 al 20 de julio Joice Reyes Lens

21 al 3 de agosto Teófila Aguirre, N. Arispe Rafael Canaviri Lucio Piedra Fernando Zensano

Salón Mario Unzueta

Exposiciones de los artistas

9 al 22 junio Escuela Raúl Prada

23 de junio al 3 de julio Ana Rosario Montaño Ana Beatriz Jacobs Ivo Ríos

read more ...

Archive Issues

2007 | 2008 | 2009